Date: 10th February 2016 at 8:25pm
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For many years now, the spotlight has become firmly focused upon the ever-increasing ticket prices across the Football League. Just where can the line be drawn?


While the Premier League’s absurd pricing may steal the majority of headlines, there is actually quite a growing concern about clubs in England’s second, third and fourth division following suit.

As I write this, Hull City are top of the Championship. To see a ‘Category A’ match at the KC Stadium, it could cost an adult up to £36: around the same price as a pair of children’s trainers, or 300 gel pens from a local stationer.

So, the question begs, how much is too much?

Recently, I was fortunate enough to attend a match at Craven Cottage, using my friend’s season ticket who was away that weekend. So ultimately, it cost me nothing. However, a ticket would have cost an adult up to £40.

The stadium was only approximately one-third full, and I honestly felt sorry for anyone who did pay.

Perhaps, if your team are winning week-in, week-out, whilst performing amazingly and leaving the supporters feeling agog, one wouldn’t mind forking out £30-ish to experience that atmosphere. It would be interesting to see how fans of the teams in the top third of each league felt about ticket prices, compared to those in mid-table, and those fighting a relegation battle.

One Twitter user, @twentys_plenty, ran a poll to determine whether a boycott could actually impact ticket prices. 54% of 294 voters said that yes, it could.
However, another user, @elliothtafc” replied, expressing his views:

“@twentys_plenty extremely Loyal fans won’t boycott regardless neither will season ticket holders. Has to be imposed”

Alternatively, @richard_grove claimed:

“What worries me about decreasing prem ticket prices is that lower league clubs could get priced out the game destroying the football league.”

Only recently has Leeds United owner, Massimo Cellino, tried to ban the Sky Sports team from broadcasting so many games as it impacts the amount of people attending football matches.

If less people turn up, due to Sky – paying a large fee – broadcasting matches across their multi-million-customer network of paying viewers, then football clubs might have to increase ticket prices to make up for the lost revenue: hitting the real supporters, who have stuck by, the hardest.

No-one said football was a simple game, or simple business – and the enigmatic discussion continues.

Do you attend Football League matches? What’s your opinion on ticket prices? Have they gone too far? Are they about right? Should they be increased further? I’d love to hear your view!